When you boldly implement a new business model, it’s critical that you get your current clients to buy in so your business can remain profitable.

But that can be tough if you go into the process without a plan. After all, change is scary for clients when they’re comfortable with your current offerings.

To put clients at ease and help them realize that your new business model will benefit them, use the following 4 strategies. While you may not be able to win every client over, you should be able to win over several who you can build profitable, long-term business relationships with.

eBook - Transition Your Clients Get Expert Advice

eBook

Transition Your Clients

Get Expert Advice
1. Make expert, benefit-driven recommendations.

If you’ve positioned yourself correctly, your clients should view you as their trusted technology advisor. Then, you can make new recommendations for your clients based on their specific business needs, and they’ll be receptive to your advice.

Show them how your services can help them stay ahead of the competition and become more profitable – this is an easy way to get them to buy in to your new business model. You might find that the only reason they don’t already have your new services is because they don’t know about them or don’t realize how much those services would help their business thrive!

2. Conduct quarterly business reviews.

Want a foolproof way to build trust with a client so they are receptive to your new business model?

Prove your value by conducting quarterly business reviews. During the reviews, show the client exactly how your services have helped them improve and grow their company.

That way, there will be no doubt in the client’s mind about your value, and they won’t hesitate to follow your expert advice.

3. Start with forward-thinking clients.

Don’t make the mistake of immediately trying to get your toughest clients to embrace a big change in your business. Instead, reach out to the clients you know will be receptive to your new services first.

Even your most open clients might still feel a bit hesitant, but you can sell your new services to them by letting them know all the specific ways those services can benefit and grow their business. Once they recognize that your new business model presents opportunities – not obstacles – for them, they’ll be ready to make the change.

4. Approach stubborn clients strategically.

Think your most difficult clients aren’t negatively affecting your business?

You may be wrong. To find out for sure, track how much time you spend on high-maintenance clients and see if they’re generating enough revenue for your business to make that time worth it. You might just realize that those clients are actually costing you money!

Also, keep in mind that stubborn clients who are a poor culture fit for you probably won’t be open to your new business model and services. If you can afford it, you should consider letting those clients go to make room for more forward-thinking, profitable clients who will be receptive to your advice.

When you’re implementing a new business model, client trust is key.

Do your clients view you as their technology advisor? Are they always open to your advice because of the strong business relationship you’ve fostered with them?

If the answer is “no,” it’s time for you to focus on building trust with your clients.

Make them feel like you’re their go-to technology guru by using your knowledge to drive real results for their business. That way, they’ll always be willing to listen when you make recommendations – like your new services.

Implementing a New Service Model?

Our revamped Ultimate Guide to As-a-Service will show you how to get your clients to buy in.

Get My Free Copy

Implementing a New Service Model?

Our revamped Ultimate Guide to As-a-Service will show you how to get your clients to buy in.

Get My Free Copy
Kathy Smith

Kathy Smith

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